Explore-the-Top-Attractions-of-Dubai2
Explore the Top Attractions of Dubai

Glittering Dubai is a holiday destination in the United Arab Emirates. This city of skyscrapers and shopping malls has transformed itself from Desert Station to the destination where tourists nest for sale, sun and family entertainment. Dubai is known for monuments such as the Burj Khalifa (the tallest building in the world) and shopping malls that feat

ity has many cultural attractions and things to do, as well as all the modern and glamorous additions. Take a stroll through the Bastakia district and Dubai, discover the time and then cycle along the Dubai Creek in a traditional dhow, and you’ll soon find out more from the city’s muddy paint.

Burj Khalifa

Burj Khalifa
JESHOOTScom / Pixabay

An important building in Dubai is the Burj Khalifa, which at 829.8 meters is the most famous of the city’s most interesting squares. For most visitors, a visit to the viewing platform on the 124th floor is required during the city sightseeing. Looking at the city skyline from a bird’s-eye perspective is just amazing. A great monitoring experience includes a multimedia presentation for Dubai and Burj Khalifa (completed in 2010) before the speed of the elevator back to the observation deck for the 360-degree view of the skyscrapers in the desert from one side and the sea up the other side. Night tours are especially popular with photographers for the world-famous sights of Dubai. Buy your Burj Khalifa in advance to avoid long queues, especially if you want to visit the weekend.

Back on the ground surrounding the Burj Khalifa, the buildings are well-decorated gardens with winding walks. There are many water features, such as the Dubai Fountain, the tallest fountain in the world, inspired by the famous Bellagio Fountains in Las Vegas.

Location: Enter Dubai Mall, Sheikh Zayed Road, Downtown

Official website: www.burjkhalifa.ae

Dubai Mall

Dubai Mall
Dubai Mall

The Dubai Mall is the city’s main center and provides access to the Burj Khalifa and the Dubai Aquarium. There is also an ice rink, a playground, and a cinema complex if you are looking for more fun options. Shopping and nutrition are endless, and there are almost always special events like live music and fashion shows in the mall. The best known are the Dubai Shopping Festival in January and February and the Dubai Surprise Festival in July and August.

Location: Doha Road, next to Sheikh Zayed Road

Official Site: http://www.thedubaimall.com/

Museum of Dubai

Museum of Dubai
TadM / Pixabay

The Exquisite Museum in Dubai is located in Fort Al-Fahidi, built in 1787 to defend Dubai Creek. The walls of the fort are built with traditional coral blocks and kept together with limes. The upper floor has wooden columns, and the ceiling is made of palm trees, clay, and plaster. In its history, the fort was the residence of the ruling family, the seat of the government, the garrison and the prison. Restored in 1971 (again extensively in 1995), it is now the city’s most important museum. The entrance has a fascinating display of old maps of the Emirates and Dubai, which show massive expansion that hit the area after an oily tramp.

In the courtyard are several ships and traditional palm trees with the tower of the Emirates. The right hall has a weapon, and the left has musical instruments emirates. Underground there are exhibition halls with exhibits and dioramas that covers various aspects of traditional life (including pearl fishing and life in the Bedouin Desert) as well as 3000-4000 years grave artifacts in the archaeological site of Al Qusais.

Address: Al-Fahidi Street, Al-Fahidi

Bastakia (Old Dubai)

Bastakia
Bastakia

Bastakia Quarter (sometimes called the fourth Al-Fahidi) was built in the late 19th century as the home of wealthy Persian traders who mainly engaged in beading and textiles and were attracted to Dubai for business tax and access to Dubai Creek. Bastakia occupies the eastern part of Bur Dubai along the creek, and here are the coral walls and limestone with many peaks of wind, perfectly preserved. Wind turbines supplied the first form of air conditioning here – the wind trapped in the towers was pulled to the houses. Presumably, Persian merchants have transplanted this architectural element (often in Iranian coastal houses) from their homeland into the Gulf.

The narrow streets, which are covered in distinctive Arabic architecture, point to past and much slower times in Dubai’s history. In the neighborhood, you will find a Majlis Gallery, with a collection of traditional Arabic ceramics and furniture (in the wind) and XVA Gallery, with a collection of contemporary art (which are located in one of the historic buildings).

Location: Al-Fahidi, Bur Dubai

Sheikh Saeed Al-Maktoum House

Sheikh Saeed Al-Maktoum House
Sheikh-Saeed-Al-Maktoum-House

Sheikh Saeed Al Maktoum was the ruler of Dubai 1921-1958 and grandfather of the current ruler. The former residence has been restored and restored as a museum, which is a fine example of Arabic architecture. The actual house was built in 1896 by Father Sheikh Saeda so that he could observe the activity of the ship from the veranda. It was demolished, but today’s house has been reconstructed with the original location of the recalled original molded model, which includes teak wood doors and plaster-barred windows with ventilation screens with floral and geometric patterns. Thirty rooms were built around the central courtyard with a tower detail at the top.

As part of the exhibition of photos and documents Historical Museum in Dubai, with many beautiful old photographs in Dubai, the period between 1948 and 1953. The sea wing museum has fisherman photos, pearls, and shipbuilding. On the screen, there are many cards, cards, coins and seals showing the development of the emirate. Nearby is the house of Sheikh Obaid bin Thani, restored with traditional interior design.

Address: Al Khaleej Street, Bur Dubai

Dubai Creek

Dubai Creek
Dubai Creek

Dubai Creek divides the city into two cities with Deira in the north and Bur Dubai in the south. The river was an influential factor in the city’s growth, attracting immigrants first for fishing and pearl diving. Small settlements grew along the creek are still 4000 years, while modern times began in 1830-s when the Bani Yas tribe settled in this area. The Dhow Wharfage is located on the shores of Dubai Creek, north of the Al-Maktoum Bridge. They still use small traders in the Gulf; some of them are 100 years old. You can stop by and watch as the bale is loaded into and unloaded from the Dhows. Dhow workers often call visitors to the boat to get a glimpse into the lives of these traditional sailors. Many of the ships travel to Kuwait, Iran, Oman, India and even the Horns of Africa. This little break from Dubai’s traditional economy is still a busy and fascinating place to stroll.

If you travel the entire river, you can take a trip to one of the many Dhows that have been restored as tourist cruises or ferries aboard Bur Dubai and Deira banks.

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